First time in an ambulance

On Saturday, we were celebrating Brian’s birthday.

Mom invited us to sneak out to get his birthday present (a new pair of boots!) and when we returned we had Brian’s favorite homemade subs and Derby Pie. It was delicious!

Mary Alice had been sick all week, but was finally feeling more like herself, entertaining us with silly giggles and dancing.

As we were reading a story to Mary Alice for bedtime, Brian noticed that Sebastian looked very pale. Sebastian had been congested all day and I figured he had the cold that we were all sharing. We picked him up and listened to his lungs and you could hear a little rattle. I called his pediatrician and left a message for the after hours nurse to call me back.

As we waited for the call back, Sebastian started crying inconsolably. He never cries like that. Mom and I headed to urgent care to set our minds at ease. The next 12 hours are a blur – chest x-rays, a sweet doctor telling me good job on following my instincts, an ambulance ride (my very first), Phoenix Children’s ER, three attempted IVs (none successful), the respiratory pediatric team, suctioning out his little lungs multiple times, watching his chest retract. We almost went home twice, but then he would do something that was concerning, so we were admitted to Phoenix Children’s hospital. At 5:30am, he finally slept.

I cannot say enough amazing things about the staff at Phoenix Children’s hospital. They were kind, communicative, amazing people. They made sure I knew exactly what they were doing and what was happening. They reassured me and listened to any concerns. They tested me on being able to fully care for him at home and watch for warning signs – which I appreciate greatly. They educated me on how to use a bulb syringe properly. You’d think a mom of five would know this, but  I learned some new tricks. I am excellent with the boogers now.

Over the past 48 hours, I’ve been reminded that my tribe is amazing. My friends and family rally like no one’s business. My prayer warriors have a direct line to His ear. He didn’t have to answer with such speediness and mercy, but oh how He did.

I watched Sebastian’s oxygen drop so low and immediately remember the prayer:

“Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.
Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me. Amen.”

Mary’s intercession, along with my mother Mary and my grandmother Mary are such a comfort to me.

I’m so thankful that memorizing prayers was always important to my family. In the quiet of the night, it is the most comforting thing to remember scriptures and prayers.

I’m sure the ER staff thought I was a little crazy as I said “never was it known” over and over. I watched his oxygen level climb step by step right back up to 100%.

We are home now, with a fresh reminder that my family is my mission field. This is where I will fight, pray, feed, and love those in need. This is where my sleepless nights are spent at the feet of My Father petitioning Him for their sake. My home is where I will find the needs that I will work to care for.

tinuviel - Oh, my! That fills in so many details of the Instagram post. That must have been scary for you and an unfortunately memorable birthday for Brian. I’m thankful your mother was at hand so you were never (physically) alone in all that and the other kids could be home and not hustled to the hospital or off to stay with friends. My first ride in an ambulance was early in our marriage on an Easter with a loved one who had a bad fall. We just told each other the story again this Easter. Thanks be to God that Sebastian is all right now.

Mary Thompson - Reminders on our call. A beautiful testimony
Of Gods grace and especially your mission statement for the family. A call to arms for this frequently ignored mission field. Well done.